Now that Daylight Saving Time has ended in Connecticut and across the nation, you unfortunately must do more nighttime driving than you did during the spring and summer months. Not surprisingly, nighttime driving poses a much higher risk for the occurrence of motor vehicle collisions and the serious injuries you can suffer in them. 

Per the National Safety Council, you face your greatest risk of becoming involved in an accident between the hours of 4-7 p.m., the height of the evening rush hour, and 12-6 a.m. These are the times when most fatal accidents occur. Why? Because nighttime driving includes all of the “big three” causes of fatal accidents: 

  • Poorer driver visibility 
  • Increased driver fatigue 
  • More impaired drivers on the road 

Visibility 

Of course you realize that you cannot see as well when you drive at night as you can when you during the daytime. However, do you realize how much your vision becomes compromised? Your bright headlights provide you with only 500 feet of visibility, and the dimmer headlights you must use for city driving provide only 250 feet. 

Follow these tips to help you see better at night: 

  • Dim your dashboard lights. 
  • Make sure your windshield is completely clean. 
  • Wear anti-reflective glasses. 
  • Never look directly at oncoming traffic. 
  • Slow your speed appropriately. 

Driver fatigue 

Due to human internal clocks, people get tired when it gets dark. This can make for a dangerous evening commute, especially on Friday evenings when everyone is exhausted from a long work week and wants to get home in a hurry. 

Impaired drivers 

As you might expect, the later the hour on Friday and Saturday nights or earlier the hour on Saturday and Sunday mornings, the greater risk you have of being struck by a vehicle with an alcohol-impaired driver behind the wheel. 

Being on the road in the dark carries its own risks. Nighttime is when you should drive the most vigilantly, responsibly and defensively.